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Options for
ALAS Resilience
Builder
Implementation

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ALAS Resilience Builder is designed to be easily adapted to a variety of secondary education programs and classroom schedules.

Mix and match the following options to best suit your program's schedule and requirements.

Class worksheets can be assigned as independent homework to be completed by participants on their own time; however, if the students are reading below sixth grade level it is recommended that class assignments be done in class with support.

See below for suggestions for assigning students to classes for credit.

 

Option One

One 40-minute lesson presented on a daily basis. If the program is presented five days per week, it will take 8 - 10 weeks to complete the program. Class activities and homework need no modifications using this model.

Option Two

One-half lesson ( 20 minutes) presented on a daily basis. If the program is presented five days per week, it will take 16-20 weeks to complete the program. Class activities and homework need no modifications using this model. With this option, the scripted lesson is presented one day and the follow-up activities are done the next day.

Option Three

One 40-minute lesson presented three times per week. It will take 13 -15 weeks to complete the program. Class activities and homework need no modifications using this model. This option works well with "block scheduling" or if the teacher has the students for two periods per day and can flexibly integrate Resilience Builder into the weekly schedule. Resilience Builder can also be adapted to two lessons twice or three times per week to accommodate block scheduling.

Option Four (least recommended option)

One 40-minute lesson presented two times per week. It will take about 20 weeks to complete the program. Class activities and homework need no modifications using this model. It should be noted that twice weekly contacts with students may not be sufficient to sustain behavior change in highest-risk students, especially if they have attendance challenges. If the Resilience Builder teacher has contact with the target students on other days it is recommended that they spend 15 minutes "checking in" with how the students are applying the skills and any problems the students are facing.

ALAS Resilience Builder© as an Elective Course.

Students can be scheduled into a quarter or semester of Resilience Builder class as an elective. Many schools, especially middle schools, have an elective "wheel" that includes 4 separate elective classes for each student. Resilience Builder can be one of the courses in the year long elective wheel for targeted students only or cycling through all students.

ALAS Resilience Builder© as a Language Arts Credit Class,
Supplemental Acadamic Instruction or Career and Life Skill Credit Course.

Resilience Builder lessons have build-in activities that reinforce basic literacy skills and language arts standards such as: oral expression, spelling, vocabulary, written expression, listening, critical thinking and problem solving and career. The program can be easily and beneficially upgraded and integrated with comprehensive language arts standards if the teacher uses prose and poetry to reinforce and extend skills learned in the Resilience Builder lessons. Additionally, many standards for introductory career or life skill courses will be met using Resilience Builder lessons and may only require some supplementary additions to the content students receive.

ALAS Resilience Builder© as a community or before/after-school course.

Because the lessons are scripted, it is possible to provide ALAS Resilience Builder in a non-school setting or afterschool program. That said, it is very important for the non-school staff to work closely with the school to monitor whether participating students are applying the resilience skills to the school setting. In this regard, an efficient communication system such as a weekly checklist can be used to monitor students' behavior (please call our support line or email us for additional ideas in offering a community program).

 

Option
One

Option
Two

Option
Three

Option
Four

As a regular class or elective

x

 

 

 

Use block scheduling

 

 

x

x

As part of another class

 

x

x

x

Before/After-school program

 

x

x

x

Community Program

x

x

x

x

Special Education class

x

x

x

 

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